Our Modern Victorian Bathroom Renovation Progress

It’s official: we have too much going on right now. I’m back at work, we are planning our wedding (which includes a strict diet for me, grrr), and we need to get Michael’s little house ready to sell. With all of the commotion, you can imagine why we are very slow moving in the bathroom renovation department. That said, we actually have made quite a bit of progress and we can finally start to see how the space will be transformed. We might even be able to take a shower in there in a couple of weeks, fingers crossed.

This bathroom renovation is no small feat. It is getting a complete overhaul. We moved duct work and plumbing so that we don’t have a toilet in front of a door or a floor vent right in front of our tub. We’ve also researched and purchased some gorgeous products that will give the bathroom a Modern Victorian look. Even though we are midway through the process, it already looks so much cleaner and more functional. You can see the dramatic change starting to come together in the photos below.

Before the Bathroom Demo

Progress on a 1920's Victorian fixer upper.

Who thought it was a good idea to wedge the toilet in right next to the doorway?

 

Renovating a 100 year old Victorian house.

Another odd choice, the vent was right in front of the bathtub and the bathroom door. We moved it to be along the back wall.

 

A tour of an abandoned 1920's Queen Anne.

Our bathroom tub surround with red tape holding it to the wall. We will completely replace it with ceiling to tub subway tile.

 

A whole-house tour of a Victorian fixer-upper.

The layout of this bathroom didn’t work at all. We spent a lot of time, moving plumbing and ducts to give it a better flow.

 

Victorian bathroom renovation.

I love the blue of these tiles, but they were an absolute mess. The floor tiles were even worse and everything had to go.

 

Demolition and Renovation Prep

Renovating an abandoned Queen Anne house.

You can see that the tiles were glued onto the walls with liquid nails. It took a lot of hammering to pry them off.

 

Progress on a complete bathroom renovation.

Michael ripped out the old tub surround and chipped away the crumbling plaster.

 

DensShield tile backer going up for a tub surround.

Michael also prepped for tile by installing DensShield tile backer on the floor, walls, and tub surround.

 

DensShield application in a Victorian bathroom remodel.

More DensShield on our floor. Notice, the vent is no longer in front of the tub. Yay!

 

Choosing and Laying Out the Bathroom Fixtures

Remodeling a 100 year old bathroom.

To accommodate the plumbing, we had to build out a small wall behind the vanity and toilet. We will be adding a little shelf on top of the wall, and we will tile it with white subway tile. We set the toilet and vanity in place to see what it would look like. It is so much more functional with the toilet facing the tub and the vanity closest to the door.

 

Faucet choice for a Victorian remodel.

We tried to go with a classic look for our sink and tub faucets. We went with Kingston Brass for our sink faucet.

 

Victorian tub fixtures for a remodel.

I got so excited when I found this Anzzi tub faucet and showerhead with a cross bar handle. Plus, we were also lucky enough to find it at Home Depot when it was on sale. Perfect.

 

Twenties classic merola tile in a bathroom remodel.

We went bold with the floor tile by choosing this Twenties Classic tile by Merola. It looks like a turn of the century encaustic tile but it is a less expensive printed ceramic version.

 

Classic encaustic tile look in a Victorian fixer-upper.

It takes a while to lay out the tiles perfectly, but it looks stunning when you start to see the pattern coming together.

 

Check back in a couple of weeks (or maybe months if we get too distracted) to see the finished product. I’m so excited to see it all come together and finally have a working shower in our new place!

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